Okavango Delta Wildlife Monitoring
Okavango Delta, Botswana

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW

Students now have the opportunity to gain valuable conservation experience by joining our monitoring team situated in the north eastern edge of the Okavango Delta, one of the world’s largest inland delta’s and most recently inaugurated the 1000th World Heritage Site.

Project Type:
Student Internship
Duration:
4 weeks +
Price:
$2,450.00 First 4 weeks
$1,100.00 Every following 2 weeks.
Choose your currency
Requirements:
18+
Overview
What Will I Do?
Project Objectives
Project Location
How Do I Get There?
Dates and Costs
Apply Now

Overview

Students now have the opportunity to gain valuable conservation experience by joining our monitoring team situated in the north eastern edge of the Okavango Delta, one of the world’s largest inland delta’s and most recently inaugurated the 1000th World Heritage Site.

Wildlife ACT will be performing wildlife monitoring, through the Standardized Natural Resource and Wildlife Monitoring Protocol (SNRWMP), a protocol implemented by the Department of Wildlife and National Parks (DWNP). This was implemented in an attempt to standardize data collection about wildlife population demographics, in order to base management decision making on reliable data.

In the region of Khwai, Wildlife ACT will be fulfilling the Standardized Natural Resource and Wildlife Monitoring Protocol. This protocol aims to provide managers with reliable and long term data in order to make informative decisions on how best to conserve wildlife and their habitats.

Applications: Please fill in the student application form. We will then process all applications and confirm your placement on the project, following which you will need to pay the deposit to secure your placement. Please note that along with the application form you will be required to submit a copy of your passport and medical aid/insurance details.

Group Bookings: We can offer a student group rate, so round up a few other students and get them to participate too. You might even get enough of them to cover all your costs…. There is a space on the application form for you to fill in your groups’ name (competition for the most imaginative name – prize on arrival!) and the list of other members of your group.

FAQs

LOCATION

Khwai Community Concession is over 1,815 sq kilometres in size, with its southern boundary lying on the Moremi Game Reserve boundary and its western edge forming the Chobe National Park boundary.

What Will I Do?

In Africa, one can only attempt to schedule each day’s events and goals – however normally Africa time and events take over. However, we feel that it is important to give you an idea of what your day-to-day schedule looks like.

The work which we do in Botswana will be largely governed by the Standardised Natural Resource Monitoring (SNRM) protocol. This protocol was developed with funding from USAID by the Southern Africa Regional Environmental Program (SAREP), under the guidance of the DWNP and the University of Botswana, to better understand wildlife fluctuations and facilitate constructive and applicable management of wildlife populations within Ngamiland.

Day to day activities will include some of the following aspects:

Monitoring Protocol – fulfilling the 12 activities required by the protocol depending on the time of year.

  • Bird Transects (terrestrial and aquatic species) and recording of bird nesting sites.
  • Herbivore Transects
  • Static Photo records
  • Rainfall records
  • Flood level records
  • Predator ID Kits
  • Predation records
  • Human Wildlife Conflict records
  • Poaching incident reports
  • Invasive plant species
  • Fire Occurrence Records
  • Rare and endangered species individual identification and monitoring

Protocol Support Data Collection

  • Spoor Transects to determine predator population density
  • Camera Trapping to determine predator density and capture sightings of rare species.

Monitoring Protocol Training and Data Collation

  • Guides from neighbouring lodge/tourism operations are also required to collect the protocol data. Wildlife ACT is responsible for collecting all of the lodges data loggers together and compiling the data.
  • Guides will on occasion need training in the monitoring protocol or a refresher course on the protocol and the techniques used to collect the data. Wildlife ACT will be involved in training the guides in order that they fulfill the protocol in the areas that they operate.

The Daily Grind:

To give you an indication of your day-to-day life as a Wildlife ACT student here are a few examples of what your days might look like:

  • Mornings normally begin before the sun rises as these early starts are a key element in all wildlife research and monitoring. Morning activities include bird, spoor, herbivore or vegetation transects, or checking on previously set camera traps.
  • Following the mornings session, the team will return to camp for the rest of the morning which is spent doing various needed jobs for the day, which might include cleaning, preparing for lunch and/or dinner, and/or doing your laundry.
  • Early afternoons will be spent either inputing data collected that morning, planning the afternoon session or resting.
  • Late afternoon to early evening will be spent in the field, following up on any sightings or reports from the morning, removing invasive plants or sweeping for snares and/or doing a patrol drive.
  • At least one day a week will be dedicated to data input in camp so to avoid a pileup of data to process and a chance to assess the next week’s work. This will be especially true during the summer months, as it is often too hot to be in the field during midday through to the afternoon.
  • Please note that as this camp runs on solar power, there will be limited power in the evenings. Most evenings will be spent around the fire or socializing in the main area.

Free time:

Free time in camp can be spent relaxing in your tent, reading, birding or chatting with your fellow students and researchers based at the camp.

During weekends off there are a number of activities that students can enjoy. This includes a day trip through Khwai Community Concession or Moremi Game Reserve, both well-known wildlife areas in the Okavango Delta. Wildlife ACT facilitates this ourselves, however if entering a National Park you will be required to cover the cost, as this is not included.

Additionally, there is a local tourism operator that takes mekoro trips on the Khwai River during the day for 2 – 3 hrs. A mekoro is a traditional dugout canoe, which is powered by a poler on the back of the canoe. It is an authentic experience discovering how people have explored and navigated the delta for decades.

Maun is the closest town, which lies about 4 – 5 hrs from Tau Camp. Maun is a popular tourist destination lying on the edge Thamalakane River channel, which runs through the Okavango Delta, forming the Boteti, which then runs into the Ngami Lake.

Activities in Maun include: scenic flights over the Okavango Delta, boat trips into the Delta and its infamous Chiefs Island, mekoro trips into the delta with a poler to guide you on your way and horse riding along the river! Please note that any weekends in Maun that are not layover stops, you will be required to cover your own costs, including food, accommodation and any activities that you choose. However, we are happy to assist you in making arrangements.

Weekend Trips:

* Please let us know if this is something you would be interested in doing during your time with us and we will assist in making arrangements for you. Please note that it will be your responsibility to cover your accommodation, food, transfer fee from the border and any visa costs that are applicable to you.

FAQs

Project Objectives

The DWNP has initiated a constructive feedback system which supports management decisions and a long term wildlife monitoring vision.

This will, for the first time, provide a standardized approach to monitoring at a regional and national level, allowing informed decisions to be made by the DWNP with regards to conservation management at a national level.
The overall objective of the protocol is to establish a greater understanding of the patterns and underlying processes of herbivore population demographics in the dynamic ecosystems of Botswana. The Khwai section of the study feeds into a wider study, which includes the whole of Ngamiland.

The Project Aims:

  • To standardize data collection methods.
  • To actively monitoring the ecosystems in order to identify any issues or underlying process that threaten the system.
  • To provide ‘active’ feedback to responsible parties.
  • To train local community and lodge based guides on the protocol, in order to expand its ‘coverage’.
  • To understand how other data collection methods can be used to build or support the current protocol.
  • To support research efforts through the Standardized Natural Resource and Wildlife Monitoring Protocol.

FAQs

Project Location

Khwai Community Concession

Khwai Community Concession (NG18) is over 1,815 sq kilometres in size, with its southern boundary lying on the Moremi Game Reserve boundary and its western edge forming the Chobe National Park boundary. The village of Khwai and home of the management entity Khwai Development. . .

How Do I Get There?

If you are joining one of our projects in Botswana you will need to arrived on your arranged arrival date in Maun. Daily flights take place from Johannesburg to Maun. Please note that if you are coming from another African destination there are a number of flights directly into Gaborone and do not necessarily require a flight through Johannesburg. Daily flights are scheduled between Gaborone and Maun. Departure will also be out of Maun.

Additionally, there are bus options that will take you through Gaborone but this might take a few days depending on the connection timing.

It is suggested that before booking your flight to either international airport, that you discuss it with your Wildlife ACT contact who is assisting you to arrange your trip. Arrival destinations may vary according to the time of year or other variable factors. If these factors change after you have booked your flight to either Maun or Kasane, Wildlife ACT will be responsible for any additional travel arrangements and costs.

The project in Khwai is situated approximately 5 hours drive from Maun. You will be collected at your arranged arrival destination and transfered through to the project by Wildlife ACT. Departures will operate in the same manner with Wildlife ACT dropping you off in time for your departure arrangements in Maun.

FAQs

Dates and Costs

ZAR USD EUR GBP
4 Weeks 32754.01 2450.00 2246.93 1916.11
6 Weeks 47459.89 3550.00 3255.75 2776.40
8 Weeks 62165.78 4650.00 4264.57 3636.70
10 Weeks 76871.66 5750.00 5273.40 4496.99
12 Weeks 91577.54 6850.00 6282.22 5357.29
TRANSPORT FEE 2005.35 150.00 137.57 117.31

Starting Dates


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2017

17 April
01 May
31 July
14 August
29 August
12 September
26 September
09 October
23 October
07 November

2018

01 January
15 January
15 January
29 January
12 February
26 February
12 March
26 March
09 April
23 April
07 May
21 May
04 June
18 June
02 July
16 July
30 July
13 August
27 August
10 September
24 September
08 October
22 October
05 November
19 November
Overview
What Will I Do?
Project Objectives
Project Location
How Do I Get There?
Dates and Costs
Apply Now